Category Archives: Literature

#📚Books to #read in #2018; We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy by Ta-Nehisi Coates #NoCriticsJustPolitics

#📚Books to #read in #2018; The New #Black #Politician: @CoryBooker , #Newark, and Post-Racial #America By Andra Gillespie #NoCriticsJustPolitics

At the beginning of the 21st-century, a vanguard of young, affluent black leadership has emerged, often clashing with older generations of black leadership for power. The 2002 Newark mayoral race, which featured a contentious battle between the young black challenger Cory Booker and the more established black incumbent Sharpe James, was one of a series of contests in which young, well-educated, moderate black politicians challenged civil rights veterans for power. In The New Black Politician, Andra Gillespie uses Newark as a case study to explain the breakdown of racial unity in black politics, describing how black political entrepreneurs build the political alliances that allow them to be more diversely established with the electorate.
Based on rich ethnographic data from six years of intense and ongoing research, Gillespie shows that while both poor and affluent blacks pay lip service to racial cohesion and to continuing the goals of the Civil Rights Movement, the reality is that both groups harbor different visions of how to achieve those goals and what those goals will look like once achieved. This, she argues, leads to class conflict and a very public breakdown in black political unity, providing further evidence of the futility of identifying a single cadre of leadership for black communities. Full of provocative interviews with many of the key players in Newark, including Cory Booker himself, this book provides an on the ground understanding of contemporary Black and mayoral politics.

#📚Books to #read in #2018: A World of Struggle by #DavidKennedy : How Power, Law, and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy #NoCriticsJustPolitics

#📚Books to #read in #2018 #: Carrie Mae Weems: The Hampton ProjectNoCriticsJustPolitics

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#📚Books to #read in #2018: #Reconstruction : #America’s Unfinished #Revolution, 1863-1877 by #EricFoner #NoCriticsJustPolitics

 

#📚Books to #read in #2018: #AfricanAmericans and the Living #Constitution by #JohnHopeFranklin #NoCriticsJustArtist

 

 

#📚Books to #read in #2018: #InherentlyUnequal : The Betrayal of #EqualRights by the #SupremeCourt by #LawrenceGoldstone #NoCriticsJustPolitics

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A potent and original examination of how the Supreme Court subverted justice and empowered the Jim Crow era.

In the years following the Civil War, the 13th Amendment abolished slavery; the 14th conferred citizenship and equal protection under the law to white and black; and the 15th gave black American males the right to vote. In 1875, the most comprehensive civil rights legislation in the nation’s history granted all Americans “the full and equal enjoyment” of public accommodations. Just eight years later, the Supreme Court, by an 8-1 vote, overturned the Civil Rights Act as unconstitutional and, in the process, disemboweled the equal protection provisions of the 14th Amendment. Using court records and accounts of the period, Lawrence Goldstone chronicles how “by the dawn of the 20th century the U.S. had become the nation of Jim Crow laws, quasi-slavery, and precisely the same two-tiered system of justice that had existed in the slave era.”

The very human story of how and why this happened make Inherently Unequal as important as it is provocative. Examining both celebrated decisions like Plessy v. Ferguson and those often overlooked, Goldstone demonstrates how the Supreme Court turned a blind eye to the obvious reality of racism, defending instead the business establishment and status quo–thereby legalizing the brutal prejudice that came to define the Jim Crow era.